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MX News Update 2024

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2025 NFL Draft Consensus Big Board: Will Campbell opens at No. 1, Carson Beck at top QB

The 2024 NFL Draft ended two weeks ago in Detroit, but if you think draft season has been over for a few months, you’re wrong. While fans are busy imagining how rookies will fit into their new roles, the 2025 NFL Draft is now less than a year away, so we need to take a look at who the pick of the crop could be.

The Athletics‘s first consensus 2025 Big Board combines rankings from several draft experts to identify how the top prospects are viewed relative to the rest of their class. While it’s still very early in the process, this should give us an idea of ​​which prospects will lead the conversation as we turn our attention to next year’s draft.

Our board is starting small – 25 potential candidates – due to the limited 2025 rankings available at this point in the process. As we get closer to design over the next twelve months, the board will expand. (Our last ’24 board covered the top 100 prospects.)

2025 NFL Consensus Council Draft

Player Position School

1

Will Campbell

OT

2

Mason Graham

D.T

3

Will Johnson

CB

4

Kelvin Banks Jr.

OT

5

James Pearce Jr.

EDGE

6

Travis Hunter

CB

7

Benjamin Morrison

CB

8

Deone Walker

D.T

9

Tetairoa McMillan

WR

10

Carson Beck

QB

11

Malaki Starks

S

12

Mykel Williams

D.T

13

Luther Burden III

WR

14

Abdul Carter

EDGE

15

Harold Perkins Jr.

LB

16

Nic Scourton

EDGE

17

Shedeur Sanders

QB

18

Colston Loveland

AT

19

Emery Jones Jr.

OT

20

Emeka Egbuka

WR

21

Quinn Ewers

QB

22

Denzel Burke

CB

23

Jack Sawyer

EDGE

24

Quinshon Judkins

RB

25

Tacario Davis

CB

1. How will the quarterback class play out?

In our first consensus board last year, we had four quarterbacks in the Top 25: Caleb Williams, Drake Maye, Michael Penix Jr. and Quinn Ewers. Three of those QBs ultimately declared (Ewers returned to Texas), and all three were selected within the first eight picks of the ’24 draft.

But even at that early stage, Williams was a consensus QB1 – something this class may not have. Georgia’s Carson Beck is the QB1 for now, but he’s only 10th overall in the class. That leaves room for Shedeur Sanders, Ewers or even new quarterbacks not currently on the radar to make a move — similar to Jayden Daniels’ meteoric rise to QB2 this past cycle.

go deeper

GO DEEPER

2024 NFL Draft team-by-team rankings: best and worst classes, from 1 to 32

2. Who is the best non-quarterback?

Marvin Harrison Jr. looked like the best non-QB for the entire 2024 cycle, and that came to fruition on draft night when he was selected fourth behind three quarterbacks.

The class of 2025, however, feels different. There are multiple players on big boards across the industry, so who will come out on top? LSU offensive tackle Will Campbell currently owns the top spot on our consensus board, but he isn’t actually at the top of any individual board. Instead, he’s consistently ranked in the top four. Compare that to people like James Pearce Jr. of Tennessee and Mykel Williams of Georgia, each of whom is the top-ranked candidate on multiple boards but lands in the teens on others.

There’s no clear answer at this point, but Campbell gets the first nod by remaining steady in the early rankings.

3. Is this an elite cornerback class?

Three cornerbacks (Kool-Aid McKinstry, Denzel Burke and Kalen King) made our first consensus board in 2024 – none were selected in the first round (Burke returned to Ohio State).

To open this year, we have five corners in the Top 25, including three ranked eighth or higher. Michigan’s Will Johnson, Colorado’s Travis Hunter and Notre Dame’s Benjamin Morrison will all bid for CB1 status in this class as we head into the fall. Will this be similar to 2024, when cornerbacks fell during the draft process, or will 2025 be the year a cornerback-needy team can find help at the top of the draft?

The LSU linebacker took college football by storm during his 2022 freshman campaign, but his momentum slowed in 2023. Perkins (listed at 6-foot-1, 220 pounds) is a bit of a tweener. I’m not sure NFL teams want an edge rusher of that stature, so Perkins will need to show more as an off-ball linebacker this fall to help his draft stock.

Even then, in today’s NFL — a league increasingly reliant on a certain mix of size and athleticism on defense — what is the ceiling for that type of player?

(Top photos of Travis Hunter, Will Campbell and Mason Graham: Dustin Bradford/Getty Images; Peter Joneleit, Brian Rothmuller/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)